Definition of

Boot

  1. (noun, artifact) footwear that covers the whole foot and lower leg
  2. (noun, artifact) British term for the luggage compartment in a car
  3. (noun, feeling) the swift release of a store of affective force
    what a boot!
    he got a quick rush from injecting heroin
    he does it for kicks
  4. (noun, artifact) protective casing for something that resembles a leg
  5. (noun, artifact) an instrument of torture that is used to heat or crush the foot and leg
  6. (noun, act) a form of foot torture in which the feet are encased in iron and slowly crushed
  7. (noun, act) the act of delivering a blow with the foot
    the team's kicking was excellent
  8. (verb, contact) kick; give a boot to
  9. (verb, body) cause to load (an operating system) and start the initial processes

via WordNet, Princeton University

Origin of the word Boot

  1. "footwear," early 14c., from O.Fr. bote "boot" (12c.), with corresponding words in Prov. and Sp., of unknown origin, perhaps from a Gmc. source. Originally for riding boots only. The verb meaning "kick" is Amer.Eng. 1877; that of "eject" is from 1880. more
  2. "profit, use," O.E. bot "help, relief, advantage; atonement," lit. "a making better," from P.Gmc. *boto (see better). Cf. Ger. Bu?e "penance, atonement," Goth. botha "advantage." Now mostly in phrase to boot (O.E. to bote). more
  3. "start up a computer," 1975, from bootstrap (n.), 1953, "fixed sequence of instructions to load the operating system of a computer," on notion of the first-loaded program pulling itself, and the rest, up by the bootstraps. more

via Online Etymology Dictionary, ©2001 Douglas Harper

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