Definition of

Cant

  1. (noun, artifact) two surfaces meeting at an angle different from 90 degrees
  2. (noun, communication) stock phrases that have become nonsense through endless repetition
  3. (noun, communication) insincere talk about religion or morals
  4. (noun, communication) a characteristic language of a particular group (as among thieves)
  5. (noun, object) a slope in the turn of a road or track; the outside is higher than the inside in order to reduce the effects of centrifugal force
  6. (verb, motion) heel over
    The ceiling is slanting

via WordNet, Princeton University

Origin of the word Cant

  1. "insincere talk," 1709, earlier, slang for "whining of beggars," (1567), from O.N.Fr. canter "to sing, chant" from L. cantare, freq. of canere "to sing" (see chant). Developed after 1680 to mean the jargon of criminals and vagabonds, then applied contemptuously by any sect or school to the phraseology of its rival. more
  2. "slant," late 14c., Scottish, from O.N.Fr. cant (perhaps via M.L.G. kante or M.Du. kant), from V.L. *canthus, from L. cantus "iron tire of a wheel," possibly from a Celt. word meaning "rim of wheel, edge," from PIE base *kantho- "corner, bend" (cf. Gk. kanthos "corner of the eye"). more

via Online Etymology Dictionary, ©2001 Douglas Harper

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