Definition of

Smoke

  1. (noun, act) (baseball) a pitch thrown with maximum velocity
    he showed batters nothing but smoke
  2. (noun, act) the act of smoking tobacco or other substances
    smoking stinks
  3. (noun, artifact) street names for marijuana
  4. (noun, artifact) tobacco leaves that have been made into a cylinder
  5. (noun, attribute) something with no concrete substance
    it was just smoke and mirrors
  6. (noun, communication) an indication of some hidden activity
  7. (noun, phenomenon) a cloud of fine particles suspended in a gas
  8. (noun, process) a hot vapor containing fine particles of carbon being produced by combustion
  9. (verb, consumption) inhale and exhale smoke from cigarettes, cigars, pipes
    Do you smoke?
  10. (verb, weather) emit a cloud of fine particles

via WordNet, Princeton University

Origin of the word Smoke

  1. late O.E. smoca, related to smeocan "give off smoke," from P.Gmc. *smeukanan (cf. M.Du. smooc, Du. smook, M.H.G. smouch, Ger. Schmauch), from PIE base *smeug(h)- "to smoke" (cf. Arm. mux "smoke," Gk. smykhein "to burn with smoldering flame," O.Ir. much, Welsh mwg "smoke"). Smokestack is f… more
  2. O.E. smocian "to produce smoke," see smoke (n.). Meaning "to drive out or away or into the open by means of smoke" is attested from 1593. Meaning "to cure (bacon, fish, etc.) by exposure to smoke" is first attested 1599. In connection with tobacco, the verb is first recorded 1604 in James I's "Counterblast to Tobacco." Smoking gun in figurative sense of "incontest… more
  3. "cigarette," slang, 1882, from smoke (n.1). Also "opium" (1884). Meaning "a spell of smoking tobacco" is recorded from 1835. more

via Online Etymology Dictionary, ©2001 Douglas Harper

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